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Why Your Child Really Needs to Learn About Cybersecurity

Posted by Jane Shearer on August 24, 2020 at 1:51 PM

cyber bullyingSince most learning is now moving into the digital age, teaching your kids about cybersecurity is a must. Here are some very real reasons why!

Identity Theft

Over 1 million children had their identities stolen, and that number is growing exponentially, according to a Javelin Strategy & Research survey. Children are often specifically targeted by hackers and identity thieves, since kids tend to have clear credit records compared to adults.

Once criminals obtain enough information to open up a bank account in your child’s name, they go on to rack up mountains of debt. To prevent this from happening to your child, it’s critical that they are taught basic cybersecurity protocols that prevent identity theft by not talking to strangers online or giving out sensitive personal information via email or text.

Malware and Viruses

Students tend to inadvertently introduce viruses and malicious software into home devices as they can be tricked into downloading bogus classroom materials. A Kaspersky analysis found that nearly 234,000 downloaded “essays” contained malware that’s designed to spread into local networks and contacts.

Spotting potential malware entries is a basic cybersecurity skill. Potential malware also involves ads that pop up claiming they have won something or have the opportunity to win something in a game that they play.

To prevent this from occurring to your child, teach them about how to spot bogus emails and links.  

Future Employment

Children tend to be lax with their information when they sign up for social media sites, apps, and online games. This information can end up in the wrong hands as proven by the nearly 4,000 data breaches last year, according to Risk Based Security in the US.

Not only does it make your kid’s privacy vulnerable, but it will affect them in the future, too. Personal information that’s shared online stays there and can haunt your children once they start looking for jobs some years from now.

Employers are now making it part of their hiring process to scope out the online presence of their applicants. To keep your child’s future bright, teaching them smart cybersecurity protocols like being mindful of the info they share, like their names or controversial opinions.

Mindful posting can save them from awkward situations with future employers and safeguard their privacy in the long run.

You can’t always be there to watch over your child as they use computers and the internet, but you can sufficiently arm them with the smarts to stay safe. Basic and advanced cybersecurity knowledge can and will save your child from dangers that may often seem innocent enough.

Take your time to find more resources to help you better explain the reasons why your child needs to learn about cybersecurity so that they can continue to use the web responsibly.

Related Posts

Valuable Lessons Your Child Can Learn From Playing Video Games

Tips to Help Your Family Learn More About The Environment During COVID

How Recording Yourself Improves Your Thinking & Learning

 

Topics: Confidence & Resilience, Bullying

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