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The Learning Success Blog

How to Teach Kids about Money Management in a Practical Way

Posted by Jane Shearer on October 16, 2019 at 5:00 AM

Around a fifth of 15-year-olds in Australia do not have basic financial literacy, according to a new financial literacy assessment results report.

While in no way is debt solely dependent on poor money management, it can certainly be exacerbated by it and it is never too early to learn about the importance of sound financial strategy. Follow these tips and ensure the process is as fun as it is informative!

Money Talks

Money somehow seems to be a slightly taboo subject in many homes, with few parents discussing money matters with their children.

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Topics: Learning, Teaching

Easy Ways to Make Science Fun for Your Kids

Posted by Emily Preston on September 10, 2019 at 4:58 PM

While children can absorb new information at an amazing rate, they can lose it just as quickly. Did you know that learning loss is a big problem over the summer holidays?                                   

Consequently, six weeks of the new term are spent relearning old material. It is estimated that just two to three hours of active learning a week is enough to prevent learning loss over the summer – and a few hours of private tutoring is an ideal way to maintain your child’s learning (if this financially feasible, of course). If you’re worried about what other parents might think, don’t worry – 96% of parents say they wouldn’t judge others for using a tutor.

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Topics: Learning, Teaching

How to Learn From YouTube: For Your Studies, Hobbies and Work

Posted by Jane Shearer on September 8, 2019 at 4:16 PM

How to learn from YouTube

YouTube is the most popular online video sharing platform now in the world, there are millions of interesting videos on a wide range of different topics, many of which can actually be very educational.   Students on YouTube learning something new

There is something for everyone and there are many opportunities for learning. This article will look at how you can use YouTube for learning new things, as well as developing existing knowledge.

The YouTube Learning channel

Besides being able to search for topics of interest and choosing from the highest-ranking videos, there is actually a dedicated You Tube Learning channel full of videos on a wide range of different topics designed to help people learn new things, develop their knowledge in areas of interest, pick up new skills and maybe even find new hobbies. 

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Topics: eLearning, Learning

Can Meditation and Mindfulness Improve Your Learning?

Posted by Jane Shearer on August 10, 2019 at 2:12 PM

There has been a surge of interest in meditation in recent years due to mounting scientific evidence and research that links regular meditation with improved physical and mental health and well-being.   

Meditation has a great deal of brain boosting effect also, including improved memory, attention span and learning capabilities. This article will explore the ways in which meditation can improve learning.

Improved problem-solving abilities

Studies show that practicing meditation can help us become more creative and flexible in our thinking. This in turn improves our ability to problem-solve and conceive of novel or original ideas.

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Topics: Learning

Teaching STEAM, “soft” Skills, Minecraft and Lego Robots: John Burfoot

Posted by Peter Barnes on June 5, 2019 at 1:14 PM

Peter Barnes

What is STEM and why did it become STEAM?  

I asked John Burfoot, a STEAM teacher in a New South Wales Primary school to explain and we recorded our chat as an episode of The Learning Capacity Podcast.         

John also told me about how STEAM lessons enable students to learn valuable 'soft' life skills, as well as technical and technological skills.

His journey from a student who failed all his final high school exams to a degree qualified teacher is inspirational, and can serve as a reminder to students that their lives are not defined by what marks they achieve in school exams.

He worked as an electronics apprentice, a job in avionics, and making explosives for special effects in films before realising his passion is teaching.

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Topics: Learning, Podcasts, Careers, Teaching

Communicating from Complex to Simple: Dr Judy Ford

Posted by Peter Barnes on November 12, 2018 at 8:04 PM

Peter Barnes

How do you communicate complex information in a way that people unfamiliar with the subject's jargon can understand it? 

How do teams of experts from different disciplines communicate with each other? 

Dr Judy Ford, retired genetics expert and now a communications specialist, spoke to The Learning Capacity Podcast about ways to overcome these challenges.

She has been working with PhD students to help them navigate through their PhDs, and this includes how to communicate in writing and especially speaking.  

In the Podcast she talks about the Three Minute Thesis Competition in which students have only three minutes to communicate the ideas that are important in their PhDs.

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Topics: Writing, Learning, Podcasts

Mothers and Mothers-To-Be: Memory & Learning Reduced by too Much Sugar

Posted by Peter Barnes on April 21, 2018 at 3:27 PM

Peter Barnes

Too much sugar, especially from soft drinks, may damage your child’s learning ability and memory.

That’s the finding from a study of the diets of more than 1000 pregnant women and their children.  The study included assessments of the children’s cognitive skills at ages 3 and 7.

This research, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, suggests there may be learning benefits from reducing the sugar intake of women during pregnancy and limiting sugar consumption by their young children.  

Key findings include:

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Topics: Memory, Learning Capacity, Learning

50 Year study: Behaviour influences income more than IQ    

Posted by Peter Barnes on April 4, 2018 at 6:40 PM

Peter Barnes

New research shows behaviour in high school is a stronger predictor than IQ or socio-economic background of better jobs and higher income.  

The research has been published by the American Psychological Association based on data collected from 346,660 U.S. high school students in 1960 and follow up research 11 and 50 years later.

The 1960 high school phase measured a variety of student behaviours and attitudes as well as personality traits, cognitive abilities, parental socioeconomic status and demographic factors.

The follow-up surveys measured overall educational attainment, income and occupational prestige.

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Topics: School, Learning, Behaviour, Careers, Social & Emotional Learning

It Hurts to be Excluded - Educating with Neuroscience 2017 Conferences

Posted by Peter Barnes on April 12, 2017 at 10:02 AM

Peter Barnes

Do you know what it feels like to be discriminated against, to be excluded?

I hope you don’t, it’s not nice.

It happened to me recently.  A travel insurance company told me they would not renew the annual travel insurance policy I’d had for years.

The reason?  I’ve had a birthday.  I’m a year older, and they don’t insure people my age on that policy.

Every day in our schools some kids feel discriminated against, feel excluded.  Because they are different in some way from the group. They may be physically different. They might have learning challenges and can’t keep up with the rest of the class.

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Topics: Brain Science, Learning, Educational Neuroscience, Conferences

Education – Australia’s Leaning Tower of PISA?

Posted by Peter Barnes on December 13, 2016 at 2:02 PM

Peter Barnes

The Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy got its famous lean because the architects and engineers messed up back in the 14th century.

They didn’t build the foundations correctly.

In the 600 years since it was built the tower has turned into a tourist attraction. That’s lucky, because a tower with a lean isn’t much good for anything else.

From recent comments in the media about the latest PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) results an impartial observer could be forgiven for thinking that Australian education may be going the way of the Leaning Tower of Pisa -  interesting, but possibly not really doing the job it was built for.

The latest PISA results have shown that Australian students are continuing to fall behind other countries in maths and literacy. In the last 10 years Australia dropped from 6th to 12th in reading and from 9th to 20th in maths on this global comparison.

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Topics: Fast ForWord, Learning Capacity, Learning, For Principals

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