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New Insights About the Autistic Brain Confirm Fast ForWord Helps

Posted by Peter Barnes on March 2, 2021 at 11:28 AM

Peter Barnes

People with autism may simultaneously have too much connectivity in some parts of their brain and poor connectivity in other parts, according to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, USA, published in Nature Neuroscience in January 2015.

The research compared brain scans from a group of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and brain scans of a control group with normally developing brains.  The resting brains of the control group looked very similar to each other whereas the scans of the brains in the autistic group were all different. They showed unique patterns of connectivity, different patterns of excess or poor connectivity in each brain.

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Topics: Autism

How Art Can Help Kids on the Autism Spectrum

Posted by Jane Shearer on August 6, 2019 at 8:25 AM

Art therapy is thought to naturally complement the autistic mind as studies show that many autistic people think in pictures.

The world can be quite a scary and confusing place for people with autism, especially children.

Art therapy can help provide them with an important opportunity to be able to process and understand the world in a way that they can relate to.                          

This article will look at some of the different ways in which art therapy can benefit children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

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Topics: Autism

Why Sullivan’s Mother got Fast ForWord for Autism Help: Address Root Causes

Posted by Peter Barnes on January 15, 2018 at 5:05 PM

Peter Barnes

Why did the mother of 9 year old autistic boy, Sullivan, choose the Fast ForWord program for him, when she had a multitude of interventions available?

And did this neuroscience–based program help him?

Sullivan’s mum writes a blog, Rethinkinglearning, where she has documented her journey since he was diagnosed with autism at the age of two.

She writes:

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Topics: Autism, Fast ForWord, Learning Capacity Success Stories

Autism & Fast ForWord123: What a Difference a Few Months Make

Posted by Peter Barnes on June 29, 2017 at 4:50 PM

Peter Barnes

In the Rethinking Learning Blog a mother of a 9-year old autistic boy wrote how the Fast ForWord123 programs have improved his expressive language skills, listening skills, ability to follow directions, conversation skills, desire to interact with others, social skills and reading comprehension. 

The mother, who calls herself by her blogger title, 'Mama Woz' says, "the progress he’s made in the 3.5 months since starting Fast ForWord has been truly exponential".

Here is her story, courtesy of the Rethinking Learning Blog:

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Topics: Autism, Fast ForWord, Learning Capacity Success Stories

How Fast ForWord Helped Finn: Autism, Language & Reading Improvements

Posted by Colin Klupiec on June 30, 2016 at 10:46 AM

Colin Klupiec

Watching your child grow up is exciting and wondrous. You marvel at what they pick up and how they develop.

For Kim Rackemann and her husband, the journey with their son Finn wasn’t quite so straightforward. Finn wasn’t really hitting the usual milestones. He was found to be on the Autism Spectrum, and the main indicator was his language delay.

Despite some scepticism, Finn started the Fast ForWord program, and in what seemed to be a short space of time, the improvements started. I spoke to Kim on The Learning Capacity Podcast where she shared Finn’s story.

Listen to the podcast.

 

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Topics: Reading, Autism, Fast ForWord, Podcasts

“Phenomenal” improvements for son after Fast ForWord, says Father

Posted by Colin Klupiec on February 28, 2016 at 12:20 PM

Colin Klupiec


Dr Con Kafataris, father of six, describes the changes he saw in his son George, aged nine, as phenomenal” after George completed the Fast ForWord program.

It was a little bit of a journey to find Fast ForWord for George but after trying a few avenues, including speech pathology, Dr Kafataris came across the program through a book titled, “The Brain That Changes Itself” by Dr Norman Doidge.

“The science seemed plausible”, said Dr Kafataris, so he decided to give it a go.

What were these “phenomenal” improvements? Listen to the podcast to find out.

Or read more below for the complete podcast transcript.

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Topics: Learning Difficulties, Comprehension, Reading, Autism, Fast ForWord, Learning Capacity, Learning Capacity Success Stories, Podcasts

The Latest Neuroscience Research about Autism from Dr Martha Burns

Posted by Peter Barnes on May 18, 2015 at 12:47 PM

Peter Barnes

"The bottom line of all the research is that autism spectrum is very, very complex. There are probably as many different kinds of autism as there are children with autism spectrum disorders. So it isn't a unified group at all", said Dr Martha Burns in a recent presentation at a neuroscience learning conference in Tuscon, USA.

Dr Martha Burns is a neuroscientist, author of over 100 journal articles and multiple books, and a leading expert on how children learn. 

Here is an abridged version of her presentation about autism. Dr Burns said:

"We know that most of the research shows now that it's the long association fibre tracts that don't mature in autism spectrum disorders. But it's not the same for each child. Every child is a little bit different.

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Topics: Brain Science, Autism

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