LearnFast logo with no background.png

BLOG  |  NEWSLETTER  |  PODCAST  |  FREE RESOURCES  |  SHOP  |  CONFERENCE  |  WHAT'S ON

Delivering the world’s best evidence based solutions for learning

AU 1300 203 104  |  NZ 0800 451 959

At Home  |  At School  |  For Business  |  Homeschoolers  |  Adults

The Learning Success Blog

Uni of California Neuroscience: New Insights Into How Brains Develop

Posted by Peter Barnes on October 14, 2016 at 5:30 PM

Human Neurons Continue to Migrate After Birth.

Scientistis used to think that neurons in the human brain were pretty much set in place before birth.

In 2011, The University of California, San Francisco researchers found a few small groups of neurons still migrating after birth.

Now, new research has uncovered a mass migration that continues up to 3 months after birth.

These neurons are migrating to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for advanced cognition.

It happens at the same time infants begin interacting with their environment.

The vast late migration is not seen in other mammals.

Researchers believe this may contribute to the uniqueness of complex human cognition.

 

Related Posts

3 Famous Neuroscientists: How Brain Plasticity Helps Human Potential 

Educational Neuroscience: A Wave of Change for Teachers & Students

Brainwave Research: Fast ForWord Aids Language-Based Learning Problems

The New Science of Learning: Teachers Build Brains with Neuroscience

 

Topics: Brain Science, For Principals

      Subscribe to Email Updates

      Recent Posts

      LearnFast Blog

      All about Neuroscience & Learning

      Are you interested in trends in learning, learning technology, education, neuroscience, or treatments for learning difficulties – including auditory processing disorder, dyslexia, attention, autism and others?

      Do you have children or students you want to help achieve more from their education?

      Does literacy enhancement or English as a Second Language interest you?

      Find out what’s happening on these and other topics related to neuroscience and learning, read comments on the latest research, and join the discussions.