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Is Playing Music a form of Brain Training?

Posted by Peter Barnes on November 3, 2014 at 11:17 AM

brain trainingCould it be that musicians get regular brain fitness workouts when they practice or perform?

Research shows playing music engages practically every area of the brain, especially the visual, auditory and motor areas. Learning to play a musical instrument seems to be great for your brain. Compared to people who do not play music, musicians have:

  • Larger brain volume and more activity in their corpus callosum, the part of the brain that acts as a bridge between the two brain hemispheres.
  • Enhanced ability to solve problems in both academic and social settings.
  • Higher level executive function skills (working memory, planning and organisation).
  • Better long term memory.

So yes, it appears that playing music is a type of brain training.

Watch this short animation from ed.ted.com about music and the brain:

 

 

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Topics: Brain Science, Music

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