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How To Help Children Prepare for Their Exams & Reduce Stress

Posted by Jane Shearer on November 16, 2021 at 2:54 PM

exam preparationAre young children more stressed out about taking exams than they should be? Recent research shows that exam stress is hurting students in Australia and elsewhere. 65.1% of Australian youth report high levels of exam stress.

Even young kids aren't immune to it, especially children who will be sitting important exams for the very first time. This is why proper stress management skills are important for a child's wellbeing and academic performance.

Here's how to prevent your child from getting stressed and help them prepare for their exams. 

Discourage Cramming the Night Before

Australian kids are stressed out these days, more than they used to be, and exam stress is taking its toll on children's mental health. One thing children can do to avoid stress is sleep properly. Sleep is crucial - sleep quality may account for as much as 25% of the differences in academic performance.

Spreading the studying out over at least a few days is better than studying all night and then taking the test. If a student studies all night, they'll likely show up for their exams feeling exhausted and unable to focus. This is pretty common for secondary school students as they approach the end of school exams.

To combat stress it might help to create a plan - a plan that focuses on wellbeing. Once a student makes their body and mind a priority, there’s no reason why their school years shouldn’t be a success.

Proper sleep before a test makes students do better on their exams. Sometimes, a child might want to stay up all night studying. If that's the case with your child, allow them to stay up 30 minutes past their bedtime a few days before the exam, but not the night before. By the time the last day before the test comes around, the studying should mostly be done. Your child should aim to complete their learning well before the exam and only review it the night before.

Encourage Exercise and Time Outside

Sunlight and exercise can help to reduce stress. Students should be encouraged to spend some time outside during the time leading up to their exams. An hour of exercise the day before an exam can work better than another hour of studying.

Exercise is proven to improve academic performance. It improves health, including their brain health, and makes them more upbeat, focused, and confident enough to do well on their exams. Jogging for about 30 minutes is enough to help a child perform well in exams. A bit of light exercise is enough to improve oxygen flow to the brain.

Consider Hiring A Tutor

If your child is having trouble with exam stress, a tutor might help as it provides one-on-one learning guidance. The tutor may be able to help them prepare for exams, and being well prepared should reduce their stress levels.

The sooner your child learns how to prepare for exams properly, the better. If a child learns to handle exams without stressing when they are young, this will help them throughout their school years.

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Topics: Confidence & Resilience, Learning

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