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Fast ForWord FAQ # 7 - Should my Child do the Exercises Every Day?

Posted by Peter Barnes on November 18, 2014 at 3:25 PM

We know from the neuFast ForWord Programroscientists that it is necessary to do brain training exercises frequently and intensively in order to engage the brain's natural plasticity to make changes. Does this mean that students should do the Fast ForWord exercises every day?

Watch the answer by LearnFast specialist, Heidi.  

 

 

 

 

Prefer to read the video transcript? Here it is.

Interviewer:  What if you've got some really super keen kid that just wants to do it every day? Is that okay?

Heidi: No, the brain actually needs time to digest all this new information, it's working hard, and needs time to rest as well. Just like we really wouldn't want to work seven days a week for three months. That's the same for a child. We don't want them to get overtired and overwhelmed.

 

 See All Skills Strengthened by Fast ForWord

 

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Topics: Fast ForWord

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